SIBO

SIBO: Understanding the role of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Functional Gut Disorders.

$30.00

In this 3 hour Seminar Audio Recording, presented by Sharon Erdrich, understand the mechanisms that not only support those suffering from IBS / SIBO and related conditions, but to select appropriate interventions and know when it’s time to swap to an alternate protocol.

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(Presented 2017)
Many of our clients come to us having experimented with a range of dietary changes to try to control their digestive symptoms, sometimes eliminating important food groups. For some this helps, but many simply end up very confused about food, and often assume that they have developed food allergies. True food allergies are relatively uncommon, and even less likely to develop after childhood. Rather, reactions to food commonly occur due to an interaction between food compounds and the microbiome, and the effect this has on the intestinal wall. Understanding these mechanisms enables us to not only support those suffering from IBS / SIBO and related conditions, but to select appropriate interventions and know when it’s time to swap to an alternate protocol.

    Key Topics Discussed:

  • Common – and sometimes unexpected causes of SIBO
  • A range of clinical presentations of SIBO, including the ‘masqueraders’
  • The difference between SIBO and Candida
  • The role of lactose and fructose absorption in gut dysfunction
  • SIBO diagnostics – what are the options? Interpreting test results
  • Treatment to eradicate SIBO: Which antimicrobials to use when and for how long
  • The role of diet, pre and probiotics, digestive enzymes and prokinetics

Length: 211 minutes (2-parts)
Presenter: Sharon Erdrich
Terms: This course is subject to future edits and alterations.
CPE Points: This course is valid for CPE points. Please click here for more information.

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